Resting in love

When we meditate, we settle into stillness and meet our experience directly as it arises, moment by moment. When we notice suffering and struggle, we’re advised to ‘move closer’ to it, ‘explore’ it, ‘allow’ it. But what do we do when the pain we meet is too strong? In this short video, Tara Brach offers a nuanced alternative to working directly with pain.

 

 

“There are times that it’s not even wise or compassionate to be with pain at all…there are times when you’re in so much pain that it’s throwing you totally off balance and right into reactivity. And trying to be with it, is going to drive you more into being exhausted or uncomfortable.”

(via Tara Brach)

It ain’t what you do, it’s the way that you do it

Over at her website, much-loved teacher and author, Tara Brach, has hundreds of dharma talks available to stream or download free! As she sweetly says at the beginning of each episode, they are “offered freely, and your support matters.” I subscribe to her podcast directly through iTunes and enjoy listening while driving, walking the dogs or working out.

In her most recent offering, Three Attitudes that Nourish a Liberating Practice, Tara shares her experience and insights from a recent retreat. She begins with the line of inquiry that lead to her developing the talk: ‘what way of paying attention really wakes us up out of the dream of being a separate self?’ And then, throughout the hour, she answers this question by sharing stories and guiding brief meditations. Spoiler alert: the three special attitudes to bring to your spiritual practice that will yield results (regardless of your particular practice or faith tradition) are 1) relaxation, 2) interest and 3) friendliness.

While I’m at it, if you haven’t read it, Tara Brach’s book, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life with the Heart of a Buddha, is truly wonderful.

Blume

Breathe gently into your heart

A healing guided meditation by Jack Kornfield to open your heart. Find a quiet place, 24 mins and enjoy:

“As you breathe in the heart area gently… let yourself remember and feel the sorrows you carry from betraying or harming others… from betraying or harming yourself… and from being betrayed and harmed by others.”

Allow the meditation to take your heart from the feeling of sorrow to the peace of forgiveness, and finally to the mind of lovingkindness, for your self, your friends, your enemies and all living beings.

Hearthands

(via ZenFriend)

Deeply concerned hotdogs

I’ve just returned home from a week’s vacation in the peaceful village of Bayfield, Ontario, where all they really need to make a perfect summer beach holiday complete is a Guelph-style coffee shop, with fair-trade beans and free wi-fi.

In an effort to wean myself from giving content to Facebook, and to begin to find a regular blogging voice, I present to you last year’s Bayfield photoshop extravaganza…deeply concerned hotdogs make offerings to appease the petulant ice cream god.

deeply concerned dogs